FOUR TIPS TO

GET YOU SELLING NOW

Most amateur marketers wonder why customers don't buy from them even after they deliver excellent contents. Perhaps the contents are not as excellent as they thought.

Copywriting is the act of selling through written words. To do this, there are important things to know and a few measures to take if you want to hit your customers’ “Aha!” point.

 

KISS –Keep It Simple Stupid:

The first thing to note is that you must keep your contents super-simple –the simpler, the better. Albert Einstein wasn't wrong when he said: "everything should be made as simple as possible…"

People have their attention on something at all times, something that is of interest to them. If you want to drive a message to them about your product, it is important that you try to give off all the information you can in the shortest time possible because their time is very valuable to them –some pretend it is. So, to get them to want your product, you have to make sure that your written content is short, simple and ‘sweet'. Don't complicate things by using too many words or too complex sentences. Use plain English (or whichever language you are communicating with) and write as if you are addressing the lamest of men.

In few short sentences, tell your potential customers what your product is; the problem(s) it will solve for them; the price, and your conditions (like return policies and so on.)

Boom! You have sales rolling in already.

Make it Friendly or Semi-formal:

People tend to be moved by other people’s friendliness. You should appeal to human quality by being friendly with your writing. Communicate to your customers at a personal level; make them feel like they just received a note from an old friend.

This task demands good research to understand your type of customers and their personalities before you can relate to them at a personal level. Some persons may feel a little bit uncomfortable if you get too close while some are very cheerful, full of positive energy.

 

Specificity Matters:

You need to be specific with your statements always. It is easier to approximate values and figures but potential customers are moved by seeing the exact the figures; even though they really would have preferred it was approximated, it has a way of awakening their awe.

Imagine that you are speaking to a fund manager and he says, “For about a decade, our portfolio has grown with an average rate over 7% per annum.” It does not sound so nice. For God sake, why will a professional not know the exact average rate of their portfolio growth? You may grow uninterested in investing in him or his company. But if he says, “For the past 8 years, our investment portfolio has grown with an average rate of 7.83% per annum.” You will be quite impressed with his accuracy and your interest is fuelled, consequently.

 

Choose Active over Passive:

Writing in an active tone makes a lot of difference; fortunately, your energy can as well be felt in written contents. So write with all the energy and action that you have in you but ensure to be polite and friendly.

For example, when writing in an active tone, you’d say “Kindly click the button below to follow our current trend and updates on our terms of services.” Instead of using the passive tone that sounds like, “When the button below is clicked, our customers will receive updates on the trends and terms of our company’s services.” This passive form of writing sounds weak, uninteresting and disengaging.

So, while copywriting ensure to adopt the active tone to keep your readers engaged and motivated to act.

JARED
MILLS

©2020 by Jared Mills.

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